Food Yoga- Meatless Monday!!

Zoodle


Official Meatless Monday Blogger

I just read an article about the damaging effects of dividing time between a computer, phone, tablet and TV. It apparently shrinks the brain. So I’ve decided to put my phone away while I bounce from laptop, TV and kitchen while I type this post. I already feel smarter.

Earlier this week the mail delivered a treat. I’m now the proud owner of a spiralizer. Oh sure, many people have been using this for years, but since it’s new to  me  dear reader, it’s now new to you. This gadget has already changed my life. It transforms veggies into ribbony strands and curly shapes. And trust me, this isn’t just cool, the shapes allow for dressings and sauce to cling.

Happy-and-excited-gif

I spent my weekend enjoying this amazing east coast ‘pre-fall’ weather, bike riding, doing yoga and spiralizing everything I could get my hands on. On Friday I made a spiral cucumber, carrot, red onion salad. I added a bit of my lemon tahini dressing and tapped my toes as I chomped away. And since I’m pretty real with you when I write, I’m not ashamed to say that when I woke up at 3am for water, I had a large bite. I may or may not have had said salad for breakfast on Saturday.

Don’t judge.

Or do. I can take it.

No matter what your feelings, I’ll still share this easy Meatless Monday recipe.

Ingredients

  • squash zoodles (you can also use a mandolin- but I can’t really be trusted with one)
  • cherry tomatoes
  • red onions, very thinly sliced
  • mushrooms sliced (I used shitake, but hey grab whatever you have)
  • garlic minced (3 cloves)
  • spinach or any greens that are handy
  • olive oil- three tablespoons
  • splash quality balsamic
  • salt, pepper and white pepper
  • lemon juice from one lemon

In one pan sauté all of the veggies and ingredients except the zoodles.

  1. Heat the pan (with 2 tablespoons olive oil) over medium heat first add the onions, then garlic, then the mushrooms.
  2. In a second pan heat the remaining tablespoon of olive oil and quickly toss the zoodles for two minutes.
  3. Combine the sauce and zoodles
  4. Serve immediately

Delish.

Fair warning. Stay tuned for spiralizer recipes. If you see me running through the farmers market with loaded down with veggies and laughing with crazy eyes, keep movin’. It’s safer that way.

Namaste y’all.

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Food Yoga – Meatless Monday! (Daal Tadka)

daal


Official Meatless Monday Blogger

Happy Meatless Monday!!

This week you may want to try lentils. My recipe this week is brought to you by the blog Zenfully Delicious. I love Indian food and Daal is an easy way to try something new. For those of you new to the idea of removing meat from your diet creating interesting meals is good plan to keep you on track. Finding ‘meat’ substitutes wash’t something that worked for me. Generally speaking, I found that having great meals that didn’t need meat was the best way to me to enjoy a meatless lifestyle. While Daal is considered to be an accompaniment to an Indian meal, I had it as a main dish with some salad.

The key to Daal is the tempering of the spices at the end. Tempering spices in Indian cooking is an essential step and depending on the dish is either done at the beginning of cooking or at the end. In the case of Daal it is done at the end.

With Daal you can spice this up as much as you want. I added Garam Masala, smoked Paprika and a few drops of mustard oil to my tempering mixture.

Today’s Special is a cute indie flick I saw on Netflix. The scene with the tempering of the spices is particularly funny.

Anyway, back to the recipe.

Serves 4-6

Ingredients:
1½ cups yellow split lentils or toor lentils
½ a medium onion, finely chopped
1 large or 2 medium tomatoes, chopped
4 cloves or 2 teaspoons minced garlic
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
1 teaspoon salt
¼ cup cilantro, chopped
Juice of half lemon

3-4 cups cups veggie stock (or water) (this depending on how soupy you’d like your daal. More liquid = more soup)

Tempering ingredients:
2 tablespoons canola oil
½ teaspoon whole cumin seeds
1 clove or ½ teaspoon minced garlic
1 whole Serrano pepper
½ teaspoon cumin powder
½ teaspoon coriander powder
¼ teaspoon chili powder

Directions

  1. In a large pot add 2 tablespoons olive oil ( you could also use butter or ghee but I’m keeping the dish vegan).
  2. Saute onions, tomatoes and garlic
  3. Add the rest of the ingredients except the cilantro
  4. Bring mixture to a boil and reduce heat.
  5. I deviated from the recipe here and added a little more spice. I like lots of flavor into the pot went more cumin, curry powder, red pepper flakes, freshly grated ginger and lime juice)
  6. Prepare tempering ingredients by measuring them out first.  Don’t mix them all together. I placed them on a flexible cutting board. The process happens quickly and it will burn if you try to gather the spices and temper at the same time.  Ask me how I know this.
  7. Simmer lentils for 20 minutes (or longer if you like them softer)
  8. Temper the spices and add to the daal as it is finished cooking.
  9. Stir in the tempered spices.
  10. Serve over rice immediately.

Tempering Spices

Heat canola oil in a pan on a stovetop till it shimmers (should be hot). Turn off the heat. To this hot oil, add the cumin seeds, garlic, Serrano pepper and dry spices. Everything should sizzle in the pan. (Watch out for splattering spices during this process.)

I added a dollop of cilantro chutney which can be found in most grocery stores. In my pantry I also had some chickpea chips. Perfect for a garnish!

Enjoy!!

Namaste y’all!!

Meatless Monday – Baby Kale Salad with Spaghetti Squash and Ginger Tahini Dressing

S squash salad

 


Official Meatless Monday Blogger

Meatless Monday is more than an idea, it’s a movement. Check out the history below (From MeatlessMonday.com)

 

Meatless Monday is not a new idea. During World War I, the U.S. Food Administration urged families to reduce consumption of key staples to aid the war effort. “Food Will Win the War,” the government proclaimed, and “Meatless Monday” and “Wheatless Wednesday” were introduced to encourage Americans to do their part. The effect was overwhelming; more than 13 million families signed a pledge to observe the national meatless and wheatless conservation days.1

The campaign returned during World War II when President Franklin D. Roosevelt relaunched it to help that war’s efforts on the home front. In the immediate post-war years, President Harry S. Truman continued the campaign to help feed war-ravaged Europe.

Meatless Monday was revived in 2003 by former ad man turned health advocate Sid Lerner, in association with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future. Reintroduced as a public health awareness campaign, Meatless Monday addresses the prevalence of preventable illnesses associated with excessive meat consumption. With the average American eating as much as 75 more pounds of meat each year than in generations past, our message of “one day a week, cut out meat” is a way for individuals to do something good for themselves and for the planet.

Since 2003, Meatless Monday has grown into a global movement powered by a network of participating individuals, hospitals, schools, worksites and restaurants around the world. The reason is twofold: the simplicity of Meatless Monday’s message has allowed the campaign to be embraced, talked about and shared by participants around the world, while the health benefits of reducing meat consumption are regular stories in the nation’s news outlets.

At The Monday Campaigns, we believe Monday is the day all health breaks loose. Research shows that Monday is the perfect day to make small, positive changes. The repeating cycle of the week allows Monday, 52 times a year, to be the day people commit to all kinds of healthy behaviors.

To that end, we have launched other campaigns that leverage the Monday concept for positive outcomes, like The Kids Cook MondayMove It Monday, and Quit and Stay Quit Monday. In addition to Johns Hopkins, we’ve partnered with other leading public health schools—Columbia Mailman School of Public Health and the Maxwell School at Syracuse University—that serve with us as scientific advisors and work with us to develop evidence-based models using the Monday concept.

1. History of the United States Food Administration, 1917-1919 By William Clinton Mullendore, Ralph Haswell Lutz  (Stanford University Press, 1941)

2. Conservation and Regulation in the United States During the World War: An Outline for a Course of Lectures to Be Given in Higher Educational Institutions, Volume 2 By Charles R. Van Hise (United States Food Administration, 1918)

 

 

Here’s this week’s meal!!!

 

It’s a hearty salad. But the dressing is the star. Over the weekend someone mentioned a tahini salad dressing that was out of this world. However, the recipe is in a cookbook not yet released. So, I decided to do some homework and play around with one of my own.

 

This dressing be used on sandwiches or as a sauce for veggies and pasta.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup tahini
  • 1/2 cup water
  • juice from one lime
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • splash apple cider vinegar (I used Bragg’s)
  • splash tamari (reduced sodium)
  • splash rice wine vinegar
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • medium hunk of fresh garlic minced

Blend everything until smooth.

 

To the dressing I added:

  • baby kale
  • thinly sliced onions (next time I’ll use red or vidalia, but white is what was on hand)
  • spaghetti squash*
  • baby tomatoes quartered
  • fresh garlic- minced
  • green apple chopped
  • sea salt
  • pumpkin seed pepita (pistachios would be a tasty addition)

 

* I steamed the squash in the microwave. I sliced the squash lengthwise and removed seeds. I leveled the squash by removing a strip of skin so it would wobble and added a little less than 1/2 cup water to one half. I placed the other half on top and microwaved for 12 minutes (1.5 lb squash). Carefully I took the squash out of the microwave and let cool. Then I took a fork to pull out the ‘spaghetti’.

I tossed everything until coated and devoured as it hit the plate. Delish!!!

 

Namaste y’all! May all beings everywhere be happy and free.

What’s on your dinner menu?

Meatless Monday – Food Yoga

Meatless Monday 9:1


Official Meatless Monday Blogger

A few years ago, my sister and I started a health and wellness blog. One of the most popular series was our selection of Meatless Monday recipes. While our site is being revamped and improved I thought that the Meatless Monday tradition should live on.

Why Meatless Monday? When I first started Meatless Monday, I was still eating meat. I’m not here to judge you if you do. But there’s no fighting some facts about eating less meat. Going meatless at least one day a week is good for you and the planet.

From the Washington Post

Much of the focus on the climate impact of meat has been on cattle, and with good reason. Any way you slice it, beef has the highest environmental cost of just about any food going, and the cow’s digestive system is to blame. Ruminants — cows, sheep, goats and also yaks and giraffes — have a four-chambered stomach that digests plants by fermentation. A byproduct of that fermentation is methane, a greenhouse gas with some 20 times the heat-trapping ability of carbon. One cow’s annual output of methane — about 100 kilograms — is equivalent to the emissions generated by a car burning 235 gallons of gasoline.

If you aren’t a plant based person coming up with recipes may seem daunting- but friends that’s why I’m here. I’m committed to making this process easier, should you choose to give it a shot. Each week I’ll post one recipe. Service. Seva. We’re all in this together. And hey- don’t be shy!! If you have some great recipes and would like to share them- let me know! I’d be happy to do a guest post with a link to your blog or social media networks!

Let’s start our own food yoga movement!!!

Namaste y’all.

Check out the recipe below.

Kale and Snow Pea Sauté with Rainbow Quinoa Salad

I used:

  • large bunch of kale chopped
  • snow peas
  • garlic- 3 cloves chopped
  • scallions
  • juice from one lemon
  • medium onion- roughly chopped
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (I used lemon infused)
  • quality balsamic
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Blanch veggies for two minutes
  2. Pat dry veggies
  3. Heat large skillet with olive oil
  4. First add garlic and onions- quickly cook until fragrant
  5. Add scallions and veggies
  6. Sauté for six minutes or so (a bit longer if you like your veggies cooked through more)

For the quinoa salad

(for 4 servings)

  • 2 cups cooked rainbow quinoa
  • medium red onion sliced and cut in halves
  • cherry tomatoes- cut in halves
  • feta (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon quality balsamic  vinegar

Toss all ingredients.

The veggies can be used as sandwich filling (think wrap with hummus- yum) or tossed with pasta!!

Vegan Diaries- Collard Greens Get a Facelift

photo-21

 

In the world of southern and soul food, collard greens are a staple. They are typically cooked with ham hock and lots of fat. And since the leaves are fairly tough cooking greens long and slow is what is thought to make them delicious.

Not so it seems.

While doing training at Integral Yoga, I’d pop downstairs to their grocery store for some tasty food cooked with love. One afternoon I discovered sautéed greens and haven’t looked back. They take 15 minutes and have a fresh, vibrant taste. You would think that with so few ingredients these would taste boring. You would be mistaken.

Y-um.

 

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • Big bunch of greens – stems removed and shredded. (I used my bare hands and made it mini playtime)
  • 5 garlic cloves minced
  • coarse salt (Maldon is my fave)
  • 1/2 c water (or veggie stock)

 

Directions

  1. Heat oil over medium heat. Cook garlic by stirring constantly until it’s just about golden brown.
  2. Add the greens, baby!! Stir in salt.
  3. Reduce the heat to medium low and add liquid.
  4. Cover and steam for 10 minutes.
  5. If liquid is left in the pan turn heat to medium and quickly stir until liquid evaporates.
  6. Et voilà!

These are so good I’ve been making batches and having them for lunch and with dinner. Tons of greens are available at farmers markets this time of year- so stock up!!!

 

Namaste y’all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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