Saturday Yoga- Self Care

self.care_.bomb_

 

Happiness is an inside job.

– William Arthur Ward

Teaching is a strenuous activity. There’s a tangible and intangible exchange of energy. With a group of teenagers I have to corral the energy and work on creating a sense of stillness and peace. Teaching a class at 6:45 on a Thursday evening with people who are ready for Friday is another story entirely, but it still requires an expenditure of energy to keep the room creative, productive and safe. In corporate classes I’m looking to maintain a sense of balance and energy and with my private clients it’s a combination of customized needs. Lastly with trauma sensitive classes it’s cultivating a sense of spirituality and creating a space for self-healing.

To do this work it requires a strong commitment to my own well-being. If I am not passionately dedicated to my own wellness, how can I be an authentic teacher? Defining what self-care means has evolved over the years. In a society that respects the notion of working oneself literally to death, thinking about self-care as an act of liberation rather than selfishness is a new concept. The World Health Organization has been redefining the definition since 2005. In a working meeting in 2013 they came up with:

 ‘Self-Care is the ability of individuals, families and communities to promote health, prevent disease, and maintain health and to cope with illness and disability with or without the support of a health-care provider.’

-World Health Organization

 

And while I think this is a great definition I like what The UK Department of Health has to say.

 

‘Self care is a part of daily living. It is the care taken by individuals towards their own health and well-being, and includes the care extended to their children, family, friends and others in neighbourhoods and local communities. Self-Care includes the actions individuals and carers take for themselves, their children, their families and others to stay fit and maintain good physical and mental health; meet social and psychological needs; prevent illness or accidents; care for minor ailments and long-term conditions; and maintain health and wellbeing after acute illness or discharge from hospital.’

-UK Department of Health

Though it’s clear as a global community we are working toward a common definition one thing is clear, taking care of ourselves is an inside job. My self-care regime starts with the idea of awareness and listening. Doing therapeutic poses as preventive measure against stress is vital. Even the simple act of supported child’s pose and some gentle self-massage keeps me balanced. Also, I try to stay in the moment and notice when I am feeling edgy, tired or the beginnings of fatigue. Instead of waiting until it’s full-blown I make time to pause. As a teacher, I think it’s my responsibility to nuture my mind body and spirit.

But hey, I’m not perfect. Consistently seeing Brian, my chiropractor and getting massages has not been a priority. I need to change that.

When I am at my best- my students get me at my best.

May all beings everywhere be peaceful and free.

 

Namaste y’all.

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3 thoughts on “Saturday Yoga- Self Care

  1. Important post, Oneika. I don’t think they told me in yoga teacher school just how much energy is expended in teaching a class. Aside from all the preparation,holding the space for the class; watching everyone with concern for their experience and their safety; constantly adjusting for class dynamics; and keeping it all interesting and productive for the students takes a lot of energy out of the teacher. Glad you brought this up.

    1. Thanks Bharat. It usually takes a lesson for me to reflect. But it wasn’t until I started teaching Therapeutic Yoga that I tuned into the idea of preventive self-care. Om shanti shanti, shanti friend.

  2. Teaching yoga expends a lot of energy. In fact once I had kids, I chose to stop teaching. After being mom I had no energy left to teach, and I wanted to go back to just being a student practicing yoga…for my self care.

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