Meatless Monday – Baby Kale Salad with Spaghetti Squash and Ginger Tahini Dressing

S squash salad

 


Official Meatless Monday Blogger

Meatless Monday is more than an idea, it’s a movement. Check out the history below (From MeatlessMonday.com)

 

Meatless Monday is not a new idea. During World War I, the U.S. Food Administration urged families to reduce consumption of key staples to aid the war effort. “Food Will Win the War,” the government proclaimed, and “Meatless Monday” and “Wheatless Wednesday” were introduced to encourage Americans to do their part. The effect was overwhelming; more than 13 million families signed a pledge to observe the national meatless and wheatless conservation days.1

The campaign returned during World War II when President Franklin D. Roosevelt relaunched it to help that war’s efforts on the home front. In the immediate post-war years, President Harry S. Truman continued the campaign to help feed war-ravaged Europe.

Meatless Monday was revived in 2003 by former ad man turned health advocate Sid Lerner, in association with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future. Reintroduced as a public health awareness campaign, Meatless Monday addresses the prevalence of preventable illnesses associated with excessive meat consumption. With the average American eating as much as 75 more pounds of meat each year than in generations past, our message of “one day a week, cut out meat” is a way for individuals to do something good for themselves and for the planet.

Since 2003, Meatless Monday has grown into a global movement powered by a network of participating individuals, hospitals, schools, worksites and restaurants around the world. The reason is twofold: the simplicity of Meatless Monday’s message has allowed the campaign to be embraced, talked about and shared by participants around the world, while the health benefits of reducing meat consumption are regular stories in the nation’s news outlets.

At The Monday Campaigns, we believe Monday is the day all health breaks loose. Research shows that Monday is the perfect day to make small, positive changes. The repeating cycle of the week allows Monday, 52 times a year, to be the day people commit to all kinds of healthy behaviors.

To that end, we have launched other campaigns that leverage the Monday concept for positive outcomes, like The Kids Cook MondayMove It Monday, and Quit and Stay Quit Monday. In addition to Johns Hopkins, we’ve partnered with other leading public health schools—Columbia Mailman School of Public Health and the Maxwell School at Syracuse University—that serve with us as scientific advisors and work with us to develop evidence-based models using the Monday concept.

1. History of the United States Food Administration, 1917-1919 By William Clinton Mullendore, Ralph Haswell Lutz  (Stanford University Press, 1941)

2. Conservation and Regulation in the United States During the World War: An Outline for a Course of Lectures to Be Given in Higher Educational Institutions, Volume 2 By Charles R. Van Hise (United States Food Administration, 1918)

 

 

Here’s this week’s meal!!!

 

It’s a hearty salad. But the dressing is the star. Over the weekend someone mentioned a tahini salad dressing that was out of this world. However, the recipe is in a cookbook not yet released. So, I decided to do some homework and play around with one of my own.

 

This dressing be used on sandwiches or as a sauce for veggies and pasta.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup tahini
  • 1/2 cup water
  • juice from one lime
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • splash apple cider vinegar (I used Bragg’s)
  • splash tamari (reduced sodium)
  • splash rice wine vinegar
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • medium hunk of fresh garlic minced

Blend everything until smooth.

 

To the dressing I added:

  • baby kale
  • thinly sliced onions (next time I’ll use red or vidalia, but white is what was on hand)
  • spaghetti squash*
  • baby tomatoes quartered
  • fresh garlic- minced
  • green apple chopped
  • sea salt
  • pumpkin seed pepita (pistachios would be a tasty addition)

 

* I steamed the squash in the microwave. I sliced the squash lengthwise and removed seeds. I leveled the squash by removing a strip of skin so it would wobble and added a little less than 1/2 cup water to one half. I placed the other half on top and microwaved for 12 minutes (1.5 lb squash). Carefully I took the squash out of the microwave and let cool. Then I took a fork to pull out the ‘spaghetti’.

I tossed everything until coated and devoured as it hit the plate. Delish!!!

 

Namaste y’all! May all beings everywhere be happy and free.

What’s on your dinner menu?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s